Talk: Dr John Langdon Down and Normansfield

Langdon Down Museum

2nd June 2018 | 11:00AM



A one hour talk about the life and work of Dr John Langdon Down and his institution at Normansfield which brought a revolutionary and enlightened approach to the care of those with learning disabilities. Includes the history of Normansfield from 1868 until its closure as an NHS hospital in 1997.

Free talk. Booking not required. Donations welcome.



‘Two Artists and Traumatic Loss’, with Caroline Garland

Freud Museum London

5th June 2018 | 7:00PM



5 June 2018
7pm

Breathe – Talks Series: On Loss and Creativity

The works in the Breathe exhibition are by two women, each of whom lost a parent – a crucial figure – at a very early age. Those losses, and their sequelae, form the focus of the works we have together chosen to exhibit. It is an appropriate choice for the Freud Museum, since intimate relationships, and the exigencies of their loss are central to Freud’s work, and to the subsequent development of psychoanalysis. In this talk, Caroline Garland will explore how the work shown in the exhibition and the topic of traumatic loss can be understood from a psychoanalytic point of view; how the psychological capacity involved in making art is connected with loss and the mourning of that loss.

Caroline Garland is a Fellow of the British Psychoanalytical Society, and founder of the Unit for the Study of Trauma and Its Aftermath in the Adult Department of the Tavistock Clinic. Caroline also initiated and curated the Tavistock’s own art collection. She is herself an award-winning and published poet (aka Beatrice Garland). In 2001, she won the National Poetry Prize. She took part in ‘Loss and Recovery: Conversation between Poets and Psychotherapists’, a symposium at the Freud Museum held in 2013. Caroline has published and broadcast widely, including being one of the lead clinicians in the ground-breaking BBC television series on the Tavistock Clinic, ‘Talking Cure’.

The series will be chaired by Jon Stokes, Clinical Psychologist and Psychotherapist, Senior Fellow Oxford University; former Chair, Adult Department Tavistock Clinic.

 BOOKING:
Full price: £10

Friends of the Freud Museum: £7

Students/concessions: £7

Advance booking highly recommended.
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/two-artists-and-traumatic-loss-caroline-garland-tickets-43831746935



Museum late – London Festival of Architecture

Royal College of Physicians Museum

7th June 2018 | 5:00PM



Explore Denys Lasdun’s Grade I listed modernist masterpiece. Discover the intriguing contents of the Royal College of Physicians museum and collection. Join a guided architectural tour of one of the 20th century’s most enduring buildings.

Acclaimed as a masterpiece of contemporary design on its opening in 1964, Lasdun’s Royal College of Physicians’ reputation has only grown over the subsequent half century. Join our professional guides for a special architectural tour, exploring parts of building not normally open to the public. Take time after hours to admire the magnificent building’s bespoke features and exceptional detailing, discover hidden surprises including an intact 17th century room, pneumatic wall and the secret of the structure’s hidden cantilever.

During your visit, take the chance to discover the Royal College of Physicians’ remarkable collections, featuring everything from artworks by Sir Joshua Reynolds, Sir Thomas Lawrence and Dame Elisabeth Frink, to scarce anatomical preparations and extraordinary medical instruments.

Highlights of any visit include:

  • priceless portraits and silver displayed throughout the building
  • medical rarities such as the Symons collection of self-care instruments and medical apparatus, the Hoffbrand collection of apothecary jars and the Prujean chest of surgical tools from the time of the English Civil War
  • an extraordinary set of 17th-century human remains, providing a fascinating insight into dissection and discovery in anatomy
  • regular displays from our archive and rare books collections

Part of the London Festival of Architecture and marking 500 years since Henry VIII brought England’s oldest royal medical college into existence. Join this museum late to explore five centuries of medicine, history, art and ideas in a museum half a millennimum old contained in architectural masterpiece half a century old.

Places are strictly limited, expecially in our guided tours. Book your FREE place here now on Eventbrite.

The London Festival of Architecture runs from 1-30 June. #LFA2018



Drawing Workshop for the Bereaved: Children & Young People

Freud Museum London

10th June 2018 | 9:30AM



10 June 2018
9.30am-12.30am

A ‘Breathe’ Exhibition Event

In collaboration with Grief Encounter, this workshop has been specifically devised for bereaved children & young people. Led by child grief specialist Shelley Gilbert, artists Fay Ballard and Judy Goldhill will introduce their work, and then participants will be encouraged to draw a personal belonging which they have brought along with them.

The workshop will be for 12 children, with an accompanying adult who is also encouraged to participate.

All materials will be provided. Participants are requested to bring a personal object with them.

This workshop is part of a series of events which coincide with Breathe, an exhibition by Fay Ballard and Judy Goldhill on display at the Freud Museum London 16 May – 18 July 2018

BOOKING:

Adult full price: £20

Adult Friends of the Museum and concessions: £15

Advance booking essential.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/two-artists-and-traumatic-loss-caroline-garland-tickets-43831746935



‘I saw the Spring Return: on Wordsworth and Loss’ with Ronald Britton

Freud Museum London

12th June 2018 | 12:00AM



12 June 2018
7pm – doors open at 6.30pm

Breathe – Talks Series: On Loss and Creativity

This is the second in the series of talks ‘On Loss and Creativity’, which coincide with the exhibition Breathe by artists Fay Ballard and Judy Goldhill.

Ronald Britton’s work is characterised by his preoccupation with truth; with what is real, and how we know this. His answer follows Keats, ‘nothing ever becomes real till it is experienced’ and his contributions follow from this. In his book ‘Belief and Imagination’ he examines the relationship between psychic reality and fictional writing, and the ways in which belief, imagination and reality are explored in the works of Wordsworth, Rilke, Milton and Blake. He explores questions such as the status of phantasies in an individual’s mind – are they facts or possibilities? How the notions of objectivity and subjectivity are interrelated and have their origins in the Oedipal triangle. How phantasies which are held to be products of the imagination, can be accounted for in psychoanalytic terms.

Ronald Britton is a training and supervising analyst with the British Psychoanalytical Society. He first trained as a doctor, and as a child psychiatrist was Chair of the Department of Children and Parents at the Tavistock Clinic, where he was involved in treatment of deprived children and their parents. This experience was influential to his psychoanalytic thinking where he maintains the importance of ‘childhood’ as a formative experience. His theoretical background is that of Freud, Klein and post-Kleinians. Additionally, he brings his own wide interests, including philosophy, theology, science, and particularly, his passion for poetry, which he uses as a basis for psychological understanding. Arguably, it is from the last that his most original contribution was inspired, namely his psychoanalytic understanding of the source of inspiration: the imagination.

The series will be chaired by Jon Stokes, Clinical Psychologist and Psychotherapist, Senior Fellow Oxford University; former Chair, Adult Department Tavistock Clinic.

BOOKING:
Full price: £10
Friends of the Museum: £7
Students/Concessions: £7

Advance booking highly recommended
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/i-saw-the-spring-return-on-wordsworth-and-loss-ron-britten-tickets-43846300465



“Please Matron!” Hospital Hygiene in 1901

Royal College of Nursing Library & Heritage Centre

18th June 2018 | 5:30PM



Are you brave enough to meet Matron?

Experience what it was like to be a Victorian nursing student in 1900, as Matron Gordon shows what life was like in the Nightingale Training School at the end of the 19th century.

This hour-long dramatic reconstruction of a lecture to probationer nurses around 1900 demonstrates how important nurses were in maintaining standards of hygiene and cleanliness in hospitals. It will be followed by a panel discussion on the history of infection control and prevention.



On the Couch: A Repressed History of the Analytic Couch from Plato to Freud

Freud Museum London

20th June 2018 | 7:00PM



The Freud Museum’s most iconic item is undoubtedly Freud’s psychoanalytic couch, but where did the couch originate? And why did it play such an important role in the history of psychoanalysis?

Author and Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Nathan Kravis explores these themes alongside a panel of academics as they discuss his latest publication, On the Couch: A Repressed History of the Analytic Couch from Plato to Freud.

About the book

The peculiar arrangement of the psychoanalyst’s office for an analytic session seems inexplicable. The analyst sits in a chair out of sight while the patient lies on a couch facing away. It has been this way since Freud, although, as Kravis points out in On the Couch, this practice is grounded more in the cultural history of reclining posture than in empirical research. Kravis, himself a practicing psychoanalyst, tells how the couch became an icon of self-knowledge and self-reflection as well as a site for pleasure, privacy, transgression, and healing.

Kravis draws on sources that range from ancient funerary monuments to furniture history to early photography, as well as histories of medicine, fashion, and interior decoration, and he deploys an astonishing array of images—of paintings, monuments, sculpture, photographs, illustrations, New Yorker cartoons, and advertisements.

Kravis deftly shows that, despite the ambivalence of today’s psychoanalysts—some of whom regard it as “infantilizing”—the couch continues to be the emblem of a narrative of self-discovery. Recumbent speech represents the affirmation in the presence of another of having a mind of one’s own.

About the author

Nathan Kravis is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College, where he is also Associate Director of the DeWitt Wallace Institute for the History of Psychiatry, and Training and Supervising Analyst at the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research.



Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego: A Marathon Reading

Freud Museum London

24th June 2018 | 1:00PM



For the discontent of our times we propose a marathon reading of Freud’s Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego.

First published in 1921, the text raises questions about the role of the leader today, tribalism, the triumph of modern masses, and what separates the individual from his or her subjectivity and lived history.

This event will breathe fresh life into this classic text and help both readers and listeners to think about our own era in the beautiful context of Freud’s final home on the 80th anniversary of his arrival in London.

The event is free with an admission ticket to the Freud Museum. There are no tickets and audience members can come and go as they please. This is a staged reading and interactive performance.

Reading: 1pm – 4:30pm

Discussion: 4:30pm – 6pm



‘Avoiding the Object’ with artist Cornelia Parker, O.B.E.

Freud Museum London

26th June 2018 | 7:00PM



The third in the series of talks ‘On Loss and Creativity’, which coincide with the exhibition Breathe by artists Fay Ballard and Judy Goldhill.

“I resurrect things that have been killed off… My work is all about the potential of materials — even when it looks like they’ve lost all possibilities.”
Cornelia Parker

Cornelia Parker is well known for her large scale, often site-specific, installations. Her engagement with the fragility of existence and the transformation of matter is exemplified in two key works: Dark Matter, a cartoon-like reconstruction of an exploded army shed, and Heart of Darkness, the formal arrangement of charred remains from a forest fire. Through a combination of visual and verbal allusions her work triggers cultural metaphors and personal associations, which allow the viewer to witness the transformation of the most ordinary objects into something compelling and extraordinary.

In 1997 she was shortlisted for the Turner Prize and in 2010 she was elected to the Royal Academy of Arts and became an O.B.E. Her work is held in numerous collections worldwide including Tate, London; British Council, London; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Yale Center for British Art, Connecticut. She was made the UK’s official Election Artist for the 2017 General Election.

The series will be chaired by Jon Stokes, Clinical Psychologist and Psychotherapist, Senior Fellow Oxford University; former Chair, Adult Department Tavistock Clinic.



Psychoanalysis and Religion: Freud, Jung, Kristeva

Freud Museum London

30th June 2018 | 10:00AM



Freud is famous for portraying religion as a collective neurosis of mankind.

He argued that religious beliefs give expression to wish-fulfilling illusions, serving the immature emotional needs of the child living on within the adult.

Such illusions – he sternly maintained – should be cast aside and replaced by ideas corresponding to reality – namely, the materialistic world view that emerges gradually but inescapably from the cumulative process of scientific observation.

This is one side of Freud – expressing his self-image as an ‘Enlightenment philosophe’ (in Peter Gay’s accurate phrase). But there is another side to Freud – unfortunately less widely known – for in the later works he develops a subtle and complex theory of society, in which religion plays a much more positive – even vital – role. Seen from this perspective, religion may be regarded as necessary for our psychological well-being – even for the survival of human kind.

We will explore a range of psychoanalytic interpretations of religion, examining different views of its function and significance in the lives of human beings.



Psychoanalysis and Religion: Freud, Jung, Kristeva

Freud Museum London

30th June 2018 | 10:00AM



Freud is famous for portraying religion as a collective neurosis of mankind.

He argued that religious beliefs give expression to wish-fulfilling illusions, serving the immature emotional needs of the child living on within the adult.

Such illusions – he sternly maintained – should be cast aside and replaced by ideas corresponding to reality – namely, the materialistic world view that emerges gradually but inescapably from the cumulative process of scientific observation.

This is one side of Freud – expressing his self-image as an ‘Enlightenment philosophe’ (in Peter Gay’s accurate phrase). But there is another side to Freud – unfortunately less widely known – for in the later works he develops a subtle and complex theory of society, in which religion plays a much more positive – even vital – role. Seen from this perspective, religion may be regarded as necessary for our psychological well-being – even for the survival of human kind.

We will explore a range of psychoanalytic interpretations of religion, examining different views of its function and significance in the lives of human beings.